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Review 2008 Billecart Brut 750ml

2008 Billecart Brut 750ml

$95.00
($95.00 Incl. tax)
1 in stock
This Vintage Brut 2008 is made up of 65% Pinot Noir and 35% Chardonnay. The dosage here is actually 4.5 g/l, the equivalent of an Extra Brut and the driest style available in Champagne.
About the Wine

    Founded in 1818, Billecart-Salmon remains the oldest family-owned Champagne estate to this day. Their vineyards are comprised of both Grand Cru and Premier Cru sites along a spectacular stretch of the right bank of the Marne River between the Montagne de Reims and the Côtes des Blancs, where a wide vein of Kimmeridgian limestone underlies a complex topsoil of clay and fossilized pebbles. Brothers François and Antoine Roland-Billecart manage this historic property. Today they have 30 ha of vines in Marueil-sur-Aÿ and 9 ha in Damery, which is known for its Pinot Meunier. Grapes are sourced from more than 40 crus with partial barrel fermentation of grand crus destined for vintage cuvées.

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         Billecart is, of course, highly regarded for its Brut Rosé, perennially the most popular of the estate’s lineup, however its vintage wines across the board are beautifully crafted, with lower-than-normal dosages and a fine, almost lacy acidity. Tom Stevenson, in The Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia, writes: “All the Champagnes here have a delicious richness of fruit, with an accent on elegance and finesse.” This Vintage Brut 2008 is made up of 65% Pinot Noir and 35% Chardonnay. The dosage here is actually 4.5 g/l, the equivalent of an Extra Brut and the driest style available in Champagne. That makes it the ideal wine to pair with caviar, oysters, sushi, and even spicy Thai cuisine!

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         Roots & Water is the first to gain access to this recently released vintage bottling. Sleek and racy, with flavors of crème de cassis, brioche, candied lemon zest and crystallized ginger, it practically springs from the bottle into your glass! Give it time in the cellar, though, and its layers and complexity will slowly unfold, while the wine gains in amplitude